New Endemic Artist – Timea Sivertsen

A massive, stoked W E L C O M E to our newest New Zealand artist, Timea Sivertsen!

Under her nickname, Timi, this talented illustrator has launched a range of character-filled, colourful kids’ art prints over on endemicworld. Originally from Hungary, Timea studied design in sunny Florida before moving to Auckland. We’re happy to have you here, Timea!

Explaining the inspiration behind her range of kids’ art prints, Timea says: “My daughter is my life, and design is my passion… so it only makes sense to combine the two. I’m fascinated watching children respond to pictures and stories, so I surround myself with the things I love in my studio, from my daughter’s drawings to photographs, home made cupcakes and items I’ve found from nature walks…”

We think you’ll love Timea’s clean, contemporary style as much as we do!

NZ-Artist-Timea-Sivertsen

Art Print on Wall

Timea in her stylish little studio nook; tools of the trade; one of her Timi art prints on the wall.

Timi Kids Art Prints

Childrens Art Prints NZ

Shop the bold, bright Timi art prints for kids at endemicworld!

 

 

 

Interior Inspiration – Swiden and Sweden

This week, we’re feeling super inspired by the brand new art prints that have arrived from Sweden-born artist Swiden. We’re huge fans of her candy-coloured, abstract artworks, and of the interior style of her country of birth. So for the love of all things Scandinavian, we went hunting for some of the best Scandi-style interiors (and walls where we’d love to see Swiden art prints hanging!)

dining room

image via Decor8
Love those hanging pendant lights in our current colour crush – candy pink! And we WANT those mint green vintage chairs at our place!
Also, polished white concrete floors? Yes please!

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Lots of iconic Scandinavian design in this little space – including the Tulip table (designed in the 50′s by Eero Saarinen for furniture brand Knoll), that statement Louis Poulsen-style light, and those gorgeous blonde timber chairs by modern design brand Muuto.

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The Scandi-look is famous for white, white and more white! Like this gorgeous little dining nook. (We love a nook!) The mis-matched chairs add some personality, and keep the look from being too minimal and austere. We’d also love to see a Swiden art print on that wall, to give this space a little burst of modern colour amongst all the white!

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A Scandi-style interior doesn’t have to mean super clean and white – there’s also the moodier look that’s popular in the long Winters. Think black furniture, lots of deep and soft grey, and plenty of natural texture with accents like wool, wood and hides. We think this space would look awesome with a little pop of colour in the form of one of our Swiden art prints (with a bold black frame.)

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This stylish Scandi space shows off the latest on-trend colour palette: soft neutrals with pastels. Keep the ‘canvas’ clean and simple, then decorate with modern, candy-coloured textiles and homeware.

scandi interior

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There’s sooo much to love in this cool kitchen – the herringbone kitchen tiles (adore!), the vintage ladder used as a towel rack,  that massive industrial light…

 

 

Swiden Art Prints

Shop all contemporary cool art prints from Swiden here!

 

 

Print Pairs – cute for kids

Some of our newest art prints for kids… matched with some of the coolest, cutest kid’s bedrooms we could find!

robot art print and kids bedroom

Yellow has got to be one of our favourite colours for decorating kids bedrooms – it’s happy and fun, can really open up smaller spaces, is gender neutral, and isn’t outgrown as quickly as more ‘babyish’ tones. We love the use of graphic black and white in this little one’s space, it really gives a cool, modern look. Our brand new Robot kids art print by designer Timi would look awesome on one of the facing walls in this room, to tie in with that yellow feature wall.

fairy art print and kids room

Every little fairy loves pink…and fairy bread! This sweet little art print (titled Finders Keepers – heehee) would be gorgeous in any little pink princess’ room.

kids art print and bedroom

NZ illustrator Dear Colleen has produced a whole range of hand-drawn number art prints, from 0 to 9.
We reckon Miss Three would love the Number 3 art print – with it’s pretty pinky bows – to celebrate her age.

girls bedroom and art print

Or how about this gorgeous Number 9 art print for a growing girl? We love the hand-drawn forest flowers, and think they’d be a cute touch above the bed, instead of the city prints. (PS: Must start scouting the op-shops for some of those vintage pant hangers, to use as art print hangers!)

Vintage-boys-bedroom-and-art-print

Loving this eclectic boys’ bedroom with all its colourful vintage finds. One of our vintage toy photographic art prints would be a cute and colourful addition to a tiny truck-lover’s space like this one.

owl art print and little girls bedroom

Pink and purple loves grey and mocha. This bedroom is so sweet… love that grey iron bed and the vintage drawers, repainted in lavender with the gold handles.
All this little girl needs now is a mummy and daddy owl to watch over her at night. (Love Birds art print from endemicworld – comes framed or unframed, we love the way it looks in a box-style white frame).

 

Shop more awesome kids art prints here!

 

 

 

Meet the Artists: Chloe Sawyer

We’re so inspired by the work (and prolific work ethic!) of emerging ‘young gun’ and endemicworld artist Chloe Sawyer (aka Chloe Ruby.)  Chloe’s work is feminine, delicate and whimsical, inspired by her love of creatures great and small and Chloe’s sunny, uplifting outlook on life. We’re big fans!

Chloe Ruby

Chloe with one of her original illustrations – also available as an art print in various sizes (framed or unframed)

Chloe Ruby Art Prints

Chloe with some of the framed art prints available on endemicworld 

You studied down at CPIT but you’re now in Auckland. What did you study, and what are you doing now?
I completed a Bachelor of Design in Applied Visual Arts last year in Christchurch and moved up to Auckland at the beginning of the year. I had planned to find a part-time job while I got my feet started as a practicing artist but I was overwhelmed with commissions that I never ended up getting a side job!

My work ranges from commercial illustration, personal commissions for people and any spare time is spent on my own artwork.

hug art print and tee

Chloe’s ‘Hug’ illustration is available on this Sophie Jo tee, and as a sweet art print (with matching ‘Kiss’ print too!)

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Chloe-Ruby-painting

Where do you create?
I have a studio in my house where I work all day, but when I need to get out I’ll take my work to a local cafe and take advantage of a new setting around people (and countless long blacks haha).

Working from home is definitely a challenge. I have to been really self disciplined and motivated, but coming straight from uni has been great because i’ve brought all of my work habits with me.

Chloe Ruby Lino Cut

Chloe uses loads of techniques to get the look she wants for each piece – from pencil sketching to hand-carved lino cut stamps

What are you working on creatively at the moment?
I have just finished some big jobs for the clothing shop Pagani doing illustrations for their Spring campaign, and illustrating books for the Ministry of Education.

Chloe Ruby art for pagani

Chloe’s custom illustrations for NZ clothing brand Pagani – love!

Right now I am so excited to have time to prepare some new work! I am working on a range of affordable mini prints, my work so far has been quite expensive and it’s so important to me that my art is accessible to everyone.

So hopefully i’ll have work to suit every budget ready for Christmas…

Chloe Ruby mini art print

One of Chloe’s new mini prints – work in progress…

Which NZ artists/designer(s) do you most look up to and why?
A couple of years ago Hayley King (Flox) spoke in Christchurch and I was so encouraged to see a woman who has created a full time career as an artist and mother. Her motivation and drive is so inspiring and also the steady development of her work is awesome to watch. She is one of those courageous women who see no limits and just shine.

Tell us about a dream project you’d love to work on…
I love collaborating and I love doing things that I know are making a positive influence on the world. So I suppose I would love to do illustration for humanitarian organisations. It’s been so cool seeing my work on new surfaces so working for clothing brands who have a huge priority on fair trade is something that would excite me.

Chloe Ruby Good Day

Chloe-Ruby-iphone-wallpapers

Chloe creates a new piece of artwork every week (free download for your desktop and iPhone wallpapers) for NZ charities Live for Tomorrow and Little Lot 

Fave music to create by?
Music is definitely so important in my work environment. But at the moment i’ve actually been enjoying listening to audio books haha. It’s a bit geeky but I love it, time flies by when I draw and listen to books.

 

Chloe posts loads of new work and goodies to her Facebook page – go check it out! www.facebook.com/ChloeSawyerArt

Chloe-Ruby-framed-art-prints

See all our Chloe Ruby art prints over on endemicworld

 

Styled: Blue Boudoir

Deep blues belong in the bedroom – they’re romantic and luxe, moody and calming. Inspired by our Growing Up In Blueberry art print (by interiors magazine designer and artist Amber Armitage), we went hunting for beautiful blues for a dreamy boudoir…

Blue-Bedroom-decor-and-art-print

Clockwise from top left:

  Have flowers in your bedroom every day of the year! (The Growing Up In Blueberry art print also comes in bold Blackberry, plus bright Raspberry and Wildberry colour palettes too.)

  A gorgeous candle is a must in every grown up girl’s space. We love the new range of Element candles from iconic international design brand, Tom Dixon (available in NZ from Simon James). The Water candle comes in a moody blue glass vessel with gold foil writing.

  The faceted Arnold Circus stool is contemporary in form, and timeless in colour. Love that steel grey blue. Available in NZ from Everyday Needs.

  This deep teal velvet bedding from Kip & Co looks – and feels – so luxe. Makes you want to get to bed early…

  New Zealand’s NODI rugs combine Italian design influences with traditional artisan Indian weaving techniques. Pictured here is the TRE design, handmade from just $370.

   Deliciously velvety pintuck cushions – from Urban Outfitters

  Continuing the velvet theme, this boho-chic style cushion, also from Kip & Co.

  Flowers above your bed, flowers beside it. Put them in this Storm Blue porcelain vase, by Danish brand Menu (available in from Simon James).

 

Sign-writing by Auckland artist Nigel Roberts

We love the hand-craft skill of sign writing, the old way, with sticks, paint brushes, eye-cometer and soul. Thats why we got local self taught sign-writing legend and artist Nigel Roberts to do ours. We grabbed this little footage to show you how he does it, enjoy!

We have also just taken delivery of one Nigels Roberts woodcut art prints too.

 

62 Ponsonby Road by Nigel Roberts aka Dagar from endemicworld.com on Vimeo.

 

Meet the Artists: Johnson Witehira

Maori designer and artist Johnson Witehira (Tamahaki (Ngāti Hinekura), Ngā Puhi (Ngai-tū-te-auru), Ngāti Hauā) first came to our attention a couple of years ago, when he launched his graphic Maori Alphabet Blocks. Johnson is fast becoming one of NZ’s most recognised Maori designers, with a strong aesthetic that comes from combining traditional Maori form and pattern with ideas from contemporary graphic design practice. As Arts Advisor Katie Taylor-Duke describes, “his work is high impact, accessible and proudly asserts our cultural history”.

His work has been seen in Wellington galleries and Times Square, New York… and now it can be in your home – because the endemicworld catalogue now includes two limited-edition Johnson Witehira art prints.

Johnson-Witehira-The-Land-of-Tara-Art-Print

Johnson-Witehira-Maori-Alphabet-Blocks

Johnson with his artwork The Land of Tara; Johnson’s Maori Alphabet Blocks – available here

You created a huge piece of art which displayed in Times Square, New York. How did that come about?
The whole New York thing was a whirlwind experience, from creating the mahi to being in New York. It was a digital art contest run by Chorus. At the time I heard about it, I was teaching English in a tiny town in northern Japan. I spent my lunch-breaks creating the animation for my entry and a few weeks later I was in Times Square. The reaction from New Zealanders back home was, and still is, really positive. In terms of the audience there, people on the street seemed to be pretty fascinated. It was the first time that the screens in Time Square had ever been synced up like that, so that was enough to have people interested.

Johnson-Witehira-Artwork

Johnson’s artwork lighting up Times Square!

You work in a lot of disciplines/media – what is your favourite?
I think anything with type. Whether it’s designing letterforms or creating typographic compositions, I find time just seems to disappear when I’m using type. My favourite media though is probably pencil and paper. I still work in A4 visual diaries for everything, you know the ones with the black covers you use at design school. I find it’s still the easiest way to develop my ideas.

Johnson Witehira Maori Typeface

Johnson created an original contemporary Maori typeface – Whakarare – creating new character forms from the ground up, while bringing in Maori typographic preferences (such as the irregularly high x-height). 

What are you working on at the moment?
I’ve just recently finished 3 projects, the Waituhi mural for the Wellington City Council, a series of window designs for The New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts and a book cover for Auckland University. I think working in a variety of media and contexts is important if you want to develop as a designer because each new project has very different challenges.

Waituhi-Mural

Initial sketch and digital design refinements for the new Waituhi mural (in Wellington City)

Johnson-Witehira-Waituhi


Johnson (and team) at work on the Waituhi mural

In terms of right now, I’m working on quite a big pasifika/Maori health project. The main challenge here is that I’ve had to extend my knowledge into the realm of pacific pattern and symbolism. As a health project, it’s nice thinking that the work will make a difference in some people’s lives. I’ve also been trying to develop Maori wallpaper with Massey, some new typefaces and a few exhibitions.

Who do you look up to creatively?
For the most part, I’m inspired by a number of Maori carvers and painters who have long since passed away. This includes Raharuhi Rukupo (Rongowhakaata), Natanahira te Keteiwi (Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki), Hone Taahu (Ngati Porou), Tene Waitere (Ngati Tarawhai) and Wero Taroi (Ngati Tarawhai). I’m moved by the level of sophistication in their work, the way they integrated new ideas and concepts into it, and the way that they combined Pakeha and Maori technologies to enhance their art. They set the precedent a long time ago I guess for what I’m doing now.

I’m also a huge fan of Robyn Kahukiwa. Her aesthetic is bold and the content is often in your face.

I saw an artwork by Lisa Reihana recently, in pursuit of venus, which also blew me away and made me realise I have a long way to go.

Fave music to paint/draw to?
When I’m designing, its drum and bass cranked up on a thousand. It might sound weird but I think the noise helps cancel out all the other thoughts going on in my head. When I’m drawing or painting it’s probably something like Donny Hathaway or Fat Freddy’s Drop. Something I can sing (badly) to.

johnson witehira artworks

Art Lightboxes in Courtenay Place

A row of lightboxes exhibiting Johnson’s work stand proud along Wellington’s Courtenay Place.

Tell us about a dream project you’d love to work on (in any discipline)
I’d love to make a Maori/New Zealand fighting game. Growing up in the Sega/Nintendo generation I’ve always had a fascination with these games, though I don’t have time to play anything these days. I’ve already started mapping out the game with all the characters and their stories. To make it how I imagine though would take millions of dollars. Who knows, maybe I’ll just be able to sell my ideas and have someone else make it – though I’d still want to be on the creative team.

Could you tell us a little more about the two endemicworld prints you have released – the Kuramarotini work, and the Tautoki work?
The prints are from my Land of Tara exhibition currently installed in the light boxes along Courtenay Place. Essentially, I was trying to illustrate the whakapapa of Wellington on the streets. Kuramarotini was the wife (or mistress in some stories) of the navigator Polynesian navigator Kupe. While Tautoki was her great-great grandson. Considering that our ancestors were Polynesian I created the works so that they progress stylistically from Polynesian to Maori. Elliot and I had been in talks for the last couple of years about getting some work on endemicworld so it was nice to finally get these up.

Johnson Witehira Art Prints

Johnson’s Tautoki and Kuramarotini art prints (limited edition of only 30); beautiful graphic details tell a story

See more of Johnson’s work and projects on his website, or shop his art prints on endemicworld here.

 

 

Nigel Roberts, Wood Cut Art Print Process

Nigel Roberts (aka Dagar) is the the king of typography. A multi-disciplined artist who racks up sleepless nights at his studio working on his art. Self-taught in the art of sign-writing, he is keeping a dying craft alive. Nigel is a co-founder of the Carwash Gallery and part of Young Gifted & Broke.

Browse Art Prints by Nigel Roberts